Abolish the House of Lords!   The English Trade Union Congress’ battle bus will be outside the House of Lords tomorrow – campaigning to abolish the House of Lords!

The English Trade Union Congress’ battle bus will be driving around Whitehall, Westminster and Parliament Square after 2pm, tomorrow, the 7th March 2017, whilst the Lords’ Brexit debate is ongoing, playing the derisive “Lion and the Unicorn” nursery rhyme to help “Drum them out of Town”!

Both the People and the elected House of Commons, with overwhelming majorities, have voted to trigger Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty. Now certain unelected Lords are putting forward amendments to frustrate the democratic “Will of the People”. This must not be allowed! These Lords are putting their own unelected views above the Brexit referendum democratic result.

Our campaign to abolish the Lords is gaining ground and is getting public support both on the streets and on the Government petition website, where the petition has now topped well over the operative threshold 100,000 signatures.

Eddie Bone, Campaign Director for the English Trade Union Congress, said:-

“The House of Lords no longer speaks for the People of England, if it ever did, but now it threatens to misuse its position to undermine the triggering of Article 50.  If carried through then this is a provocation which shows that the self-important and unelected House of Lords should be abolished!”

Eddie continued:- “The English Trade Union Congress http://englishtuc.org/ takes the view that, in a real Democracy “The People” are sovereign and implementing the “Will of the People” is the duty of our constitutional representative bodies. The House of Lords must fulfill this duty unconditionally or be abolished.”

Eddie continued:- “Rather than fulfill their duty to the People of the UK it is outrageous that many Lords are more interested in looking after the interests of EU citizens”.

 

Eddie Bone

Campaign Director for the English Trade Union Congress

Tel: 07980 667732

http://englishtuc.org/

The Campaign Director for the English Trade Union Congress is available for interviews

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Abolish the House of Lords! The English Trade Union Congress’ battle bus will be outside the House of Lords tomorrow – campaigning to abolish the House of Lords!

Abolish the House of Lords!   The English Trade Union Congress’ battle bus will be outside the House of Lords tomorrow – campaigning to abolish the House of Lords!

The English Trade Union Congress’ battle bus will be driving around Whitehall, Westminster and Parliament Square at 9.00am, tomorrow, the 3rd March 2017,  playing the derisive “Lion and the Unicorn” nursery rhyme to help “Drum them out of Town”!

Both the People and the elected House of Commons, with overwhelming majorities, voted to trigger Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty. Now it would appear that certain unelected Lords are putting forward amendments to frustrate the democratic “Will of the People”. This must not be allowed! These Lords are putting their own unelected views above the Brexit referendum democratic result.

Eddie Bone, Campaign Director for the English Trade Union Congress, said:-

“The House of Lords no longer speaks for the People of England, if it ever did, but now it threatens to misuse its position to undermine the triggering of Article 50.  If carried through then this is a provocation which shows that the self-important and unelected House of Lords should be abolished!”

Eddie continued:- “The English Trade Union Congress http://englishtuc.org/ takes the view that, in a real Democracy “The People” are sovereign and implementing the “Will of the People” is the duty of our constitutional representative bodies. The House of Lords must fulfill this duty or be abolished.”

 

Eddie Bone

Campaign Director for the English Trade Union Congress

Tel: 07980 667732

http://englishtuc.org/

 

Posted in News, UK Government | Tagged , , | 18 Comments

Abolish the House of Lords! The English Trade Union Congress’ battle bus will be outside the House of Lords – 28th February

Abolish the House of Lords!  The English Trade Union Congress’ battle bus will be outside the House of Lords tomorrow – campaigning to abolish the House of Lords!

The English Trade Union Congress takes the view that, in a real Democracy the “Will of the People” is sovereign.  The People and the elected House of Commons, with an overwhelming majorities, voted to trigger Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty. Now it would appear that certain unelected Lords are putting forward amendments to frustrate the democratic “Will of the People”. This must not be allowed! These Lords are putting their own unelected views above the Brexit referendum democratic result.

Eddie Bone, Campaign Director for the English Trade Union Congress, said:-

“The House of Lords no longer speaks for the people of England and it threatens to misuse its position to undermine the triggering of article 50.  This is a provocation which shows that the self-important and unelected House of Lords should be abolished!”

“The English Trade Union Congress battle bus will be driving around Parliament Square at 2.30pm, tomorrow, the 28th February 2017,  playing the “Lion and the Unicorn” nursery rhyme to help “Drive them out of Town!”

Eddie Bone

Campaign Director for the English Trade Union Congress

Tel: 07980 667732

Posted in ETUC News | Tagged , , | 3 Comments

Landmark Supreme Court victory ‘could affect millions of people’

Landmark Supreme Court victory ‘could affect millions of people’

Supreme Court rules unmarried woman can access dead partner’s pension

A Coleraine woman denied payments from her late long-term partner’s occupational pension from Translink, should have access to the cash the Supreme Court has ruled.

The Belfast Telegraph reported that five Supreme Court Justices unanimously ruled she is entitled to receive payments under the pension scheme on Wednesday. Go To

Denise Brewster (42), from Coleraine, Northern Ireland, challenged a ruling that she is not automatically entitled to a “survivor’s pension” as she would have been if the couple had been married. Ms Brewster and Lenny McMullan lived together for 10 years and owned their own home. They got engaged on Christmas Eve 2009 but Mr McMullan died suddenly between Christmas night and the early hours of Boxing Day morning.

Mr McMullan had worked for 15 years for Translink, which runs Northern Ireland’s public transport services. He was paying into Northern Ireland’s local government pension scheme.

Brewster’s solicitor, Gareth Mitchell of public law firm Deighton Pierce Glynn, said the ruling could affect millions of cohabitees. He said: “Denying bereaved cohabitees access to survivor pensions causes huge distress and financial hardship. Now that around one in six families in the UK are cohabiting families, reform is long overdue.”

He continued, “It also lays down the approach to be adopted when considering complaints of discrimination on the grounds of marital status in other areas. This was a decision of the Supreme Court of the UK and it affects the whole of the UK.”

The scheme is governed by rules made under the Local Government Pension Scheme (Benefits, Membership and Contributions) Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2009. Under the regulations, married partners automatically obtain a survivor’s pension but unmarried partners only receive a pension if there has been compliance with an “opt-in” requirement. This involves the pension scheme member nominating their partner for payments by giving the Northern Ireland Local Government Officers’ Superannuation Committee (Nilgosc) a declaration signed by both partners.

Although she met all the other criteria, Nilgosc refused Ms Brewster a survivor’s pension because the committee had not received the appropriate nomination form from Mr McMullan.

The High Court in Northern Ireland allowed her legal challenge against the refusal but the Court of Appeal overturned that decision and the Supreme Court has been asked to make a decisive ruling.

Jim Black of the Workers of England Union stated “This judgment will be music to the ears of many couples in the UK who live together but aren’t married and have anxieties about what rights they have. Even so, this is just one step along a complex and uncertain road. Nothing has been written in stone and different pension policies will have differently worded criteria.

He continued, “the wisest thing to do is make sure you know what you’re paying into a pension and why, regardless of your marital status. Recently we’ve seen several instances of people walking into pension schemes years ago with no clue of how it worked. Now retirement is upon them and it’s too late to tackle any issues you might have. Find out where you stand and what to expect early. Find out now.”

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What might an English Parliament look like? The Constitution Unit is consulting on the design options

What might an English Parliament look like? The Constitution Unit is consulting on the design options

The Trades Union Congress for England campaigns for an English government which produces clearly stated policies for England. Making the political parties produce a manifesto showing their policies on England has been difficult but we are gaining recognition for our work and some MPs are now joining our calls for an English Parliament. Labour Party Frank Field, a longstanding exponent of an English Parliament, has recently been joined by the former shadow cabinet members Tristram HuntChuka Umunna and John Denham. On the Conservative side the most persistent advocate has been John Redwood, whilst other prominent supporters include David Davis, now Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, and Lord Salisbury. Also Robin Tilbrook from the English Democrats and Paul Nuttall from UKIP have expressed their support for English political recognition by an English Parliament.

Only by having accountable MPs can we hope to protect our employment rights

Regards 

Stephen Morris

General Secretary 

Trades Union Congress for England

The report / consultation below is worth reading.

Please take this opportunity to fill in the Constitution Unit’s survey

The Constitution unit has published a blog post introducing our English Parliament project – https://constitution-unit.com/2016/11/24/what-might-an-english-parliament-look-like-the-constitution-unit-is-consulting-on-the-design-options/ and they have also opened a consultation survey, which you can get to through the link at the bottom of the blog post. (you need to go to the link)

The constitution Unit have asked if you could complete the survey. They have mentioned that the consultation is not an opinion poll where responses will be counted up to determine what the most popular options are – They are looking for fairly detailed responses to help guide their research.

Best

Eddie

Campaign Director

Campaign for an English Parliament

What might an English Parliament look like? The Constitution Unit is consulting on the design options

Posted on November 24, 2016 by The Constitution Unit

The Constitution Unit has recently begun work on a new project examining the design options for an English Parliament. This was once seen as an unrealistic proposal but support has grown in recent years and it therefore now deserves to be taken more seriously. Nonetheless many major questions about what an English Parliament might actually look like remain unaddressed. In this post Jack Sheldon and Meg Russell set these questions out and invite views on them through a consultation that is now open and will close on 27 January 2017.

Calls for an English Parliament have long existed, but frequently been rejected by academics and mainstream politicians. Although a Campaign for an English Parliament was set up in 1998, as the devolved institutions were being established for Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, the idea did not get off the ground. A central argument has been that such a parliament, thanks to representing almost 85 per cent of the UK’s population, would, in the words of the 1973 Kilbrandon Commission on the Constitution, result in a Union ‘so unbalanced as to be unworkable’ (para 531). As critics such as Vernon Bogdanor (p. 13) have pointed out, no major existing federation has a component part this dominant, and unbalanced federal systems (e.g. the former USSR and Yugoslavia), have tended to fail. Elites have thus often proposed devolution within England, rather than to England as a whole, as the preferred solution to the ‘English question’, and considered an English Parliament an unrealistic proposal. As the Constitution Unit’s Robert Hazell wrote in 2006, ‘An English Parliament is not seriously on the political agenda, and will never get onto the agenda unless serious politicians begin to espouse it’.

Growing salience of the English question

But various factors have increased the salience of questions around England’s place in the devolution settlement, and the idea of an English Parliament has gained new friends as a result. One factor is the gradually greater powers of the Scottish Parliament and the Welsh Assembly beyond those bestowed in the 1990s – including legislative powers in an increasing number of fields and significant tax-raising powers. This means that a growing amount of business at Westminster concerns England (or sometimes England and Wales) alone. In turn, this brings the famous ‘West Lothian question’, concerning the voting rights of MPs elected from the devolved nations, more to the fore. The Conservative government consequently introduced a form of ‘English votes for English laws’ (EVEL) in 2015, through changes to House of Commons standing orders. But the new arrangements have been rejected by opposition parties, so might not survive a change of government. Furthermore, the version of EVEL that has been introduced does not actually prevent Scottish, Welsh and Northern Irish MPs from vetoing English-only legislation. It is therefore far from clear that this will prove to be a satisfactory long-term solution.

Another contributing factor is growing interest in the future of the Union pre- and post- the 2014 Scottish independence referendum. Various unionist politicians, pundits and other political observers have considered how Scottish demands for greater autonomy may be satisfied within the UK, and federalism is being increasingly discussed. The EU referendum result has led some such as Professor Jim Gallagher (Director-General, Devolution Strategy at the Cabinet Office from 2007–10) to suggest that the devolved nations, whilst remaining within the UK, might each pursue different relationships with the EU post-Brexit. Heavyweight political support for something similar has come from former Prime Minister Gordon Brown and former Shadow Foreign Secretary Douglas Alexander. The threat of a second Scottish independence referendum, announced by First Minister Nicola Sturgeon in the immediate aftermath of the Brexit vote and repeated since, means the government needs to take such proposals seriously. This would clearly require the consequences for England to be addressed.

A third factor is a growth in English, as supposed to British, national identity among the population. Professor Michael Kenny argued in his 2014 book The Politics of English Nationhood that politicians needed to ‘accept and speak to the implications of this shift’ (p. 239). Already we know from polling that those identifying as English rather than British were more likely to support UKIP and the Leave campaign, leading mainstream politicians to consider how to increase their appeal among patriotic English voters. The English question has traditionally exercised Conservative politicians in particular, but it is now within the Labour Party that these issues are being most urgently discussed. Recent manifestations include an e-book, Labour’s Identity Crisis: England and the Politics of Patriotism, edited by former Shadow Education Secretary Tristram Hunt, and a new group of MPs, Red Shift Labour, which has published three reports on how the party can improve its English appeal. A central message is that Labour must be more prepared to embrace English identity. As yet there is little agreement on how this should be achieved, but constitutional solutions are among those being discussed.

Support has grown for an English Parliament, but no detailed blueprint exists

Hence 10 years on from Robert Hazell’s comments, the idea of an English Parliament commands significantly more political support. On the Conservative side the most persistent advocate has been John Redwood, whilst other prominent supporters include David Davis, now Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, and Lord Salisbury. Within the Labour Party Frank Field, a longstanding exponent of an English Parliament, has recently been joined by the former shadow cabinet members Tristram Hunt and Chuka Umunna. John Denham, who served in Gordon Brown’s cabinet and established a Centre of English Identity and Politics at Winchester University in 2015, is open-minded towards the idea. The Scottish National Party are also favourable, and Paul Nuttall, widely expected to win the UKIP leadership election, has pledged support for ‘an English Parliament for English people’. Of course, many other politicians remain convinced by the case against an English Parliament, and neither the Conservative or Labour leaderships appear close to support. But the growing interest across the political spectrum means that the idea deserves to be taken more seriously than previously.

Nonetheless, there remains no detailed blueprint for what an English Parliament might actually look like – compared, for example, to the proposals produced by the Scottish Constitutional Convention which formed the basis for the design of the Scottish Parliament. Hence we have recently begun work on a new project at the Constitution Unit, funded by the Nuffield Foundation, that seeks to address this gap. The project follows the Unit’s influential work on the design of the Scottish Parliament and Welsh Assembly in the 1990s. We will not be advocating for or against an English Parliament – there are strong arguments on both sides and it is ultimately for politicians to decide which case they find more convincing. Instead we will undertake an objective analysis of the options for the detailed design of such a body, in order to inform future deliberations. Whilst some proponents have addressed some design questions they often disagree on key points, while other major questions remain largely unaddressed. We will ask (and – as indicated below – are seeking views on) questions including the following:

  • Should an English Parliament be established as part of a settlement to bind the UK together in a more stable way, or to facilitate English independence? Many supporters of an English Parliament are motivated by a desire to prolong the Union in the context of pressures for Scottish independence. Frank Field, for example, has writtenthat an English Parliament is ‘the only way to save the UK’. Yet there have been recent moves towards supporting English independence among some of those campaigning for an English Parliament. The English Democrats have come out in support of independence and Eddie Bone, the Campaign Director of the Campaign for an English Parliament, has suggested that ‘English independence might be the only way forward’.
  • Should an English Parliament be separately elected, or should it be composed of English members of the House of Commons holding a dual mandate? The first of these is favoured by the Campaign for an English Parliament, and would mirror arrangements in the existing devolved nations, but the second commands significant support among advocates of an English Parliament, including Conservative MPs John Redwood and Andrew Rosindell.
  • What powers should an English Parliament have?Most proponents agree that these should be equivalent to the powers of the Scottish Parliament, but in some models, for instance that proposed by Conservative MP Teresa Gormanin the late 1990s, an English Parliament would be responsible for everything except foreign affairs and defence.
  • How many members should there be in an English Parliament, and within what structure? Under the dual mandate model mentioned above the number of members would clearly be determined by the number of English members of the House of Commons (currently 538). Were a separate English Parliament to be established it might be different – the Wilberforce Society, for example, has proposeda 180-seat English Parliament. The body might also be either unicameral or bicameral.
  • What electoral system and boundaries should be used for an English Parliament? Alternatives to first-past-the-post have been used for other devolved parliaments in the UK, but it is not certain that this would also be the case for an English Parliament. The dual mandate model obviously implies the use of first-past-the-post (so long as that system continues to be used for Westminster elections), whilst many leading advocates of a separate English Parliament have not been clear about what electoral system they envisage being used.
  • Where should an English Parliament sit? Some supporters of an English Parliament suggest that it would be based at Westminster (either in the House of Commons or House of Lords chamber) but others, including the singer Billy Bragg, have proposed locations outside London.
  • Should there also be an English government and First Minister? This is a key demand of the Campaign for an English Parliament and would almost certainly be a feature of any separately elected English Parliament. However, under the dual mandate model the UK government might continue to perform the role of the English government. The Conservative Welsh Assembly member David Melding suggests that, under his version of the dual mandate model(pp. 244–245), a UK government lacking a majority in England could either form a coalition to secure an English majority or seek to govern England as a minority administration.
  • How should an English Parliament be financed? The Barnett formula, used to determine the level of public spending in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, would not work for an English Parliament with powers equivalent to those of the existing devolved institutions, as it is based on the UK government’s English expenditure. Hence a new funding model would be needed.
  • How should an English Parliament relate to sub-national bodies such as city-regions? In debates about how to respond to the English question an English Parliament and regional devolution within England are often presented as alternatives. But in practice might it be desirable to have both?
  • What implications would an English Parliament have for the UK parliament and government? Many proponents of an English Parliament suggest that the establishment of an English Parliament should lead to a reduction in the number of members of the UK parliament and perhaps even the abolition of one chamber. Frank Field, for instance, suggests reducing the UK parliament to a Senate of 250 members. In a reportpublished in 2015 the Constitution Reform Group, headed by Lord Salisbury, stated that ‘it will almost certainly be a design specification for any new English Parliament proposal that it results in and accommodates at least a corresponding reduction in the size and cost of the Westminster Parliament’ (p. 23). A separate English Parliament would clearly also have major implications for Whitehall.

We are aware that there will be a range of views on these questions. We are hence today launching a consultation that will close on 27 January 2017. This is not about whether or not there should be an English Parliament but about how such a parliament should be designed were it to be established. It is also designed to tease out the diversity of views, and get a sense for whether there is any viable model around which proponents might unite.

It should be stressed that our consultation is not an opinion poll where responses will be counted up in order to measure the balance of opinion. We are seeking fairly detailed responses and particularly encourage responses from those who have given these questions considerable thought, and/or who have expertise in areas such as electoral systems, federalism, subnational government or devolution finance. We very much look forward to reading what respondents say, and this will guide our research as well as helping us to formulate our conclusions. We plan to publish our report late in 2017, and before then will include updates on the Constitution Unit blog.

About the authors

Jack Sheldon is a Research Assistant at the Constitution Unit, working on the Options for an English Parliament project. He is also editor of the Constitution Unit newsletter and blog.

Professor Meg Russell is the Director of the Constitution Unit.

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Telegraph Autumn Statement 2016 summary: Everything you need to know – What the Autumn Statement means for you

Telegraph Autumn Statement 2016 summary: Everything you need to know – What the Autumn Statement means for you

Chancellor Philip Hammond has said his first Autumn Statement “is focused on  preparing and supporting the economy as we begin writing a new chapter in our  country’s history”.

He announced this afternoon that he has scrapped the Autumn Statement, so this will be the last one. The Budget will now be in the autumn, with a Spring Statement, much to the amusement of MPs in the House of Commons this afternoon.

It’s a move recommended by the IMF, and Mr Hammond said: “This change will allow for greater Parliamentary scrutiny of budget measures ahead of their implementation.”

Here’s a summary of the main points:

Opening statements

    • Britain will be the fastest growing major economy this year, Mr Hammond said, quoting the IMF. It has “confounded commentators at home and abroad with its strength and resilience” since the Brexit vote.
    • Tackling the UK economy’s “long term weaknesses” is more urgent than ever, Mr Hammond said, and he promised to build an “economy for everyone”
    • Mr Hammond praised his predecessor George Osborne’s record, and said the UK needs to be “match fit” with a resiliant economy for the challenges of leaving the European Union

Forecasts

    • The Office for Budget Responsibility said growth will be 2.1pc in 2016, higher than forecast in March. However, it will slow to 1.4pc in 2017 because of lower investment and weaker consumer demand
    • Growth is expected to be 1.7pc in 2018, 2.1pc in 2019 and 2020, and 2pc in 2021
    • The OBR said the effect of the UK leaving the European Union will knock 2.4 percentage points from UK growth
    • The Government will now no longer seek to deliver a surplus in 2019/20, but Mr Hammond said he remains committed to seeing the UK’s finances return to balance “as soon as practicable” in the next Parliament, “while leaving enough flexibility to support the economy in the near-term”. Mr Osborne had planned it for this Parliamentary term

Borrowing and debt

    • Three new fiscal rules in a new draft Charter for Budget Responsibility: public finances should be returned to balance as early as possible in the next Parliament, and, in the interim, cyclically-adjusted borrowing should be below 2pc by the end of this Parliament; public sector net debt as a share of GDP must be falling by the end of this Parliament; welfare spending must be within a cap, set by the government and monitored by the OBR
    • OBR forecasts for borrowing: 2016/17: £68.2bn; 2017/18: £59bn; 2018/19: £46.5bn, 2019/20: £21.9bn, 2020/21: £20.7bn, 2021/22: £17.2bn
    • Public borrowing will drop from 4pc last year to 3.5pc this year and will continue to fall over Parliament reaching 0.7pc in 2021/22 – the lowest in two decades
    • The OBR expects cyclically adjusted public sector net borrowing to be 0.8pc of GDP in 2020/21, against the Government’s target of reducing it to less than 2pc
    • The OBR forecasts that debt will rise from 84.2pc of GDP last year to 87.3pc this year, peaking at 90.2pc in 2017/18 before falling to 89.7pc in 2018/19

Productivity

    • Mr Hammond said raising productivity is essential: he will to prioritise “high value investment” to raise productivity, funding in the short term by additional borrowing
    • There will be a new national productivity investment fund of £23bn for “innovation and infrastructure” over the next five years, aimed at science and tech research and development

Housing

    • The goal of home ownership remains out of reach for “too many”, Hammond said. A Housing White Paper will be published “in due course” which will address some of the problems in the market
    • £2.3bn housing infrastructure fund to open up sites for up to 100,000 homes
    • £1.4bn for 40,000 affordable homes, as well as a relaxation of restrictions on Government grants to help building
    • Right-to-buy pilot for housing association tenants
    • The Government will double capital spending on housing in real terms over the course of the Parliament, Mr Hammond said
    • Fees for tenants in rented accommodation will be banned

Infrastructure and transport

    • £1.1bn in English local transport networks, £220m for “pinch points” on national roads, £450m to trial digital signalling on railways and £390m for development of low emission vehicles
    • The Northern Powerhouse rail – more details from the Transport Secretary in the coming weeks
    • Mr Hammond said his ambition is for the UK to “be a world leader in 5G” and so will invest £1bn in the country’s digital infrastructure
    • There will be 100pc business rates relief for five years on new fibre infrastructure
    • £110m of funding for East West Rail, and a commitment to deliver the new Oxford to Cambridge Expressway
    • More money for the Northern Ireland Executive (£250m), the Welsh Government (£400m) and the Scottish Government (£800m) to fund infrastructure, made through the Barnet formula

Business

    • Mr Hammond said the Government’s Industrial Strategy will be a “firm foundation” on which to “build our ambition of an economy that works for all”
    • Doubling UK export finance capacity
    • Funding initiative to boost management skills
    • £400m for venture capital funds to unlock £1bn of finance for start-ups, to stop them being swallowed up by the big firms
    • Treasury-led review into accessing capital in the UK
    • Regional cities
    • Major road schemes in the north confirmed
    • £1.8bn from Local Growth Fund for English regions: £556m to Local Enterprise Partnerships in the North of England, £542m to the Midlands and East of England, and £683m to LEPs in the South West, South East and London
    • “Devolution remains at the heart of this Government’s approach to supporting local growth,” Mr Hammond said, confirming a new City Deal for Stirling, as well as deals with Swansea, Edinburgh, North Wales and Tay Cities
    • More devolution for London: the capital will receive £3.15bn as its share of national affordable housing funding to deliver more than 90,000 homes, as well as control over its adult education budget

Deficit and spending

    • We have more work to do, Mr Hammond said – departmental spending plans will remain in place, although there will be extra funding for the Ministry of Justice to tackle problems in prisons
    • “The £3.5bn of savings to be delivered through the Efficiency Review announced at the Budget… must be delivered in full,” Hammond said
    • “I want the Treasury to be an enabler for good, effective spending across Government,” Mr Hammond said, and added that he would allow up to £1bn of the savings found by the efficiency review in 2019/20 to be reinvested in “priority areas”
    • Despite the fiscal pressure we will meet our commitments to meet the budgets of defense, overseas aid and keep the triple lock for pensioners, Mr Hammond said

Tax

    • My priority as chancellor is to ensure Britain remains the number one destination for business, Mr Hammond said
    • Corporation tax will fall to 17pc, the lowest rate of corporation tax in the G20
    • Carbon Price Support will continue to be capped out to 2020
    • Business rates reduction package confirmed – transitional relief cap lowered, which Mr Hammond said “is complicated but good news”. He adds that he will increase of rural rate relief to 100pc giving small businesses in rural areas a tax break
    • Insurance premium tax to go up from 10 to 12pc next June to raise revenue
    • Ultra low emission cars, childcare and cycle to work scheme will be excluded from new plans to scrap employee tax breaks
    • Tax advantages linked to Employee Shareholder Status will be abolished
    • The Chancellor promises to crack down on tax avoidance. “We must constantly be alert to new threats to our tax base,” he said
    • New tax measures will raise around £2bn over the forecast period
    • The Government will raise point at which people start to pay tax to £12,500 and the point at which they pay the higher rate to £50k by 2020
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ETUC General Secretary slams British TUC’s General Secretary as a Hypocrit

ETUC General Secretary slams British TUC’s General Secretary as a hypocrite

I recently read that Francis O’Grady, General Secretary of the British TUC, warned companies that there will be “no hiding place” if they exploit their workers.

Francis O’Grady campaigned for the UK to “Remain” in the European Political system (EU), even though the head of their campaign, Lord Rose, confirmed wages would rise if we voted to leave.

Francis O’Grady, who is also a member of the Labour party, supported the previous Labour Leader Ed Miliband who confirmed that Labours uncontrolled immigration policy drove down wages and standards of living in the UK.

How can the Head of the British TUC warn any business about exploiting workers and calling them “greedy” when she has campaigned to keep wages and living standards low for the workers in England.”

The English TUC campaigns for improved workers rights, for higher wages and for better living standards, this is why we campaigned to leave the European political system and will continue the great English Trade Union tradition of bring unscrupulous businesses and hypocritical British Trade Unions to task.

Stephen Morris

General Secretary

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Employment Minister calls on businesses to create more opportunities for older workers

From:

New figures show that there are now more people aged 50 to 74 in work than ever before, 3.7 million more than there were 20 years ago.

The figures also show the unemployment rate for people aged over 50 has dropped to 3.3%, the lowest level since 2009. There are over 1.1 million people working beyond age 65.

Many businesses already recognise the value of older workers. For example, Barclays’ ‘Bolder Apprentices’ scheme creates opportunities for people wanting to start a new career in later life. Other firms, such as hospitality firm Whitbread, are also seeking the skills and knowledge of older workers.

Employment Minister Damian Hinds said:

It is clear that people over 50 aren’t slowing down or getting ready for retirement. I want to see businesses supporting this momentum while also reaping the benefits of the skills and expertise these older people can bring to the workplace.

People in later life are increasingly looking to stay in work and it is important that more businesses look for ways to support them.

Supporting older workers

The government is committed to supporting older workers. We have abolished the default retirement age, and extended the right to request flexible working to all employees. This means that older workers now have more choice about how and when they retire. We will continue to challenge people’s outdated perceptions, and to actively promote the business case and benefits of employing older workers.

Further help is available through the New Enterprise Allowance which enables entrepreneurs to set up their own businesses with the help of Jobcentre Plus. One in 5 businesses launched through the scheme was established by someone aged over 50.

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The Trades Union Congress of England welcomes Boeings £3bn deal for nine marine patrol planes

The Trades Union Congress for England’s General Secretary, Stephen Morris, welcomes the announcement that the UK Government will purchase nine marine patrol planes with a value of £3 Billion from Boeing.

England and the UK are well placed to compete in the global market, being outside the restraints of the European Union allows us to adapt the UK to the ever changing world economies, attracting international investments and creating jobs in England.


Boeing signs £3bn deal for nine marine patrol planes

Boeing P8
Image copyright BOEING
Image caption Boeing’s P8 maritime patrol plane

The UK government will buy nine new marine patrol planes from Boeing in a decade-long deal worth £3bn.

The Ministry of Defence’s deal for the submarine-hunting P-8A Poseidon aircraft also covers training, maintenance and support.

Boeing will build a new £100m facility for the planes at RAF Lossiemouth in Moray.

The US company will also deliver 50 Apache AH-64E attack helicopters to the British Army.

Boeing expects to create about 2,000 new UK jobs in the coming years by expanding its maintenance and support operations for both military and commercial customers in Europe.

Prime Minister David Cameron announced the P-8A deal on Monday at the start of the Farnborough Airshow.

He said it showed that the UK was open for business despite the referendum vote to leave the EU.

“Whatever uncertainties our country faces, I want the message to go out loud and clear: the UK will continue to lead the world in both civil and defence aerospace,” Mr Cameron said.

Take off for the Farnborough Airshow

A history of the Farnborough Airshow

The P-8A planes will fill a gap in the UK’s defence capabilities that has existed since 2010 when the Nimrod was retired.

“Boeing is committed to the UK government’s prosperity agenda and we share the goals of enhanced economic growth that the prime minister has set out to us,” said Dennis Muilenburg, its chief executive.

Boeing has doubled its UK workforce and more than doubled its annual spending with the UK supply chain over the last five years to more than 2,000 people and £1.8bn respectively in 2015.

Separately, the UK government announced a further £365m worth of aerospace research and development, to be jointly funded with industry.

New orders

The Farnborough show is expected to see a crop of aircraft orders announced, although not as many as the record haul of £204bn at the last event in 2014.

Nevertheless, the long-term prospects for the industry are positive, Boeing said.

Also on Monday, the company unveiled its latest annual outlook for demand for civil aircraft. Boeing predicted that huge growth in air travel over the next 20 years will mean demand for more than 39,600 new aircraft.

Boeing Market Outlook Graphic

The company said the biggest growth would come from Asia, as airlines and fleet operators expand and replace aircraft.

The increase marks a 4.1% rise on Boeing’s forecast in 2015, with the aircraft valued at $5.9tn (£4.6tn).

Passenger traffic will grow 4.8% a year over the next two decades, Boeing said.

“Despite recent events that have impacted the financial markets, the aviation sector will continue to see long-term growth, with the commercial fleet doubling in size,” said Randy Tinseth, vice-president of marketing at Boeing Commercial Airplanes.

In an industry that needs long-term planning and investment, Boeing’s annual Current Market Outlook, launched on Monday at Farnborough, is regarded as one of the most comprehensive analysis of industry trends.

Boeing said the strongest growth would come from Asia, with demand for 15,130 new aircraft, followed by North America, with 8,330 aircraft. Europe is third, with a demand for 7,570 aircraft.

Narrow-body demand

As well as growth in air travel, demand will also be driven by airlines’ need for more fuel-efficient and environment-friendly aircraft.

Boeing said the most popular market segment would continue to be for single-aisle – or narrow-body – aircraft, which are the workhorses of the industry. The US manufacturer predicted that more than 28,000 single-aisle aircraft would be needed over the next two decades.

“Airplanes that size already account for 76% of the current single-aisle global backlog, and our products have the clear advantage in that space,” said Mr Tinseth.

Boeing 737 Max
Image copyrightBOEING
Image captionBoeing’s new 737 MAX is pitched at the booming market for single-aisle aircraft

A report published last week by Alix Partners, a global advisory firm, estimated that Boeing and rival Airbus already had a 13,400-order backlog stretching years ahead, fuelled by demand for narrow-body aircraft.

Boeing and Airbus have been ramping up production of their 737 and A320 families of aircraft to meet the single-aisle demand, and have new products in preparation that they hope will win orders at this week’s Farnborough show.

Meanwhile, other manufacturers, including Canada’s Bombardier, are trying to chip away at the bottom end of the single-aisle segment.

Demand for larger aircraft, the wide-body segment, will be for 9,100 aircraft, with airlines forecast to step up fleet replacements between 2021-2028, Boeing said.

With cargo traffic forecast to grow at 4.2% a year, Boeing forecast a need for 930 new freighters and 1,440 converted freighters over the next 20 years.

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English TUC in touch with the people

During the E.U referendum the British TUC (a Labour backed organisation) came out to support the ‘Remain’ campaign, this may sound impressive, an influential group representing the people, however the facts describe a different story.

There are 165 Trade Unions registered with the Certification Office (the body who regulates Trade Unions) whilst only 51 are affiliated to the British TUC (and Labour), that’s only 31% of UK unions.

Of those 51 Trade Unions affiliated to the Labour backed British TUC only 12 declared their support for the ‘Remain’ campaign, that’s only 7% of UK Trade Unions.

The other 93% of UK Trade unions either declared their support for the ‘Leave’ campaign or didn’t declare at all.

So why wasn’t this message being put out by the British media that only 7% of Certified Trade Unions within the UK supported the ‘Remain’ campaign?

Whilst there is a Welsh TUC and Scottish TUC, which come under the umbrella of the British TUC, there was none for England.

The English TUC is a new organisation set up to address the anomaly which has affected England since well before devolution, but only become more prevalent since.

The English TUC knows the effect austerity cuts and uncontrolled immigration is having on wages and working conditions in England, that is why we supported the ‘Leave’ campaign, and  the people in England also showed their overwhelming support for ‘Leave’,  whilst the British TUC have clearly lost touch with UK Trade Unions and the workforce of UK.

Regards

Stephen Morris

General Secretary

 

 

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